The Challenges of Diagnosing, Treating and Finding a Cure for Primary Immunodeficiency – One Doctor’s Perspective

More patients are being properly diagnosed and treated than ever before, but obstacles remain in the pursuit of a cure.

By John Sleasman, MD

April 27, 2017

Immunologists are using innovative treatments such as cell-based therapies at Duke Children’s Hospital and Health Center (pictured above), which involves replacing missing cells or genes to correct primary immune deficiency diseases.

Photo courtesy of Duke Health

This is an exciting time in the Department of Pediatrics at Duke School of Medicine’s Division of Allergy and Immunology. Late last year we opened the Jeffrey Modell Center (JMF) for research and clinical care for children with primary immunodeficiency (PI) diseases — a group of more than 300 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body’s immune system is missing or functions improperly.

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